Roasted Lemon Puree

How to Roast a Lamb is full of elaborate sauces and spreads that can seem daunting to the average foodie. Michael Psilakis’s recipes sometimes include flipping back and forth across the book up to three or four times to other recipes – adding a teaspoon of another time-consuming confit or dressing. To me, it is the fun of the book. Navigating around it takes some time but once you conquer a dish – it is well worth the time and energy. The same feeling came about when completing his recipe for Roasted Lemon Puree. This sauce was surprisingly simple – only a handful of ingredients that you’ll most likely already have in your kitchen. It takes a couple hours but is a perfect weekend activity. Of course, it is even more fun when you have a friend by your side (a big thank you to Debbie who worked with me on this recipe!).

I love the way this puree is the consistency of a mayonnaise but only has whipped olive oil within a rich and flavorful roasted lemon concoction. We used the puree as a sauce for grilled lamb chops and a marinade for chicken kabobs. This would be amazing on a pita sandwich (or a BLT!), any grilled meats or veggies – or spooned out of the jar straight up.

Roasted Lemon Puree, by Michael Psilakis

  • 4 scrubbed lemons (scrubbing removes any wax on the lemons)
  • about 1/3 cup kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon or orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon dijion mustard
  • 2 crushed and pressed garlic cloves
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • pinch of sugar
  • cracked pepper
Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Roll each lemon in aluminum foil. Place on top of a mound of salt with the seam side down. Roast until packages are soft – about 1 and a half hours. Allow to cool. Cut the lemons in half and scoop out the roasted flesh into a sieve (removing any seeds). Using a spoon, scrap the white pith off the remaining lemon peel. Discard the pith and chop the remaining lemon peel.
 
In a food processor, combine the chopped zest, strained flesh and juice, mustard an garlic. Process into a smooth puree. Add the olive oil through the feed tube. Taste for sweetness and seasoning. Add any salt, sugar or pepper needed.

73 comments

    • I think the salt might be just to A) keep the lemons upright and not rolling around and B) keep the packages up off of the metal baking sheet. I don’t think it has much to do with flavoring, though some of the salt might work it’s way into the steam of the lemon.

      Baked onions in their skins also rest on salt when baking.

      • To rest stuff to be baked on a layer of coarse salt is an ancient trick in the south of Italy, albeit without a wrapping around. I guess you cold bake the lemons also without a wrapper, directly on the salt.

  1. This looks amazing, but I absolutely hate the flavor of mustard … I wonder if there’s something that could be substituted for those of us with mustard aversions?

    I do love the idea of roasting the lemons, though…

    🙂

  2. Living in AZ, everyone has a citrus tree. Come January, citrus abounds and I always grab a huge bag full of gorgeous lemons given away by my generous friends at church…but uh, I never know what to do with them all! Now I have a lovely way to prepare them! Looking forward to January! Thanks!

  3. I would love to do this. I wonder if I could do it with lemons I’ve remove the yellow from and just roast them for a shorter time. I always have so many lemons after I make limoncello. I roast garlic this way, I bet you could make a garlic puree in a similar way. Anyway, just a wonderful post and congrats on being Freshly Pressed.

    • Hi Dawn! The original recipe says two weeks. We put it on grilled chicken and veggies too. So delicious!

  4. I’m trying to imagine what this would taste like and can’t so I guess I’ll be making some up. I might add a few limes to the roasting tray and try a lime version as well. Now, I’m on my way out the door to try to find that book!

  5. Now look at these johnny come lately’s! You are freshly pressed! How did I not put a like on here before or a comment? I had even copied the recipe! 🙂 Now everyone will see what I like about your blog…the recipes! Also how you write about what you do.
    Check out other entrys folks! They smell good if you have scratch and sniff!!! 🙂

    • Stumbled on this blog from Freshly Pressed (congrats!) and couldn’t agree more, everything looks so delicious and yet so simple to make. 😀

  6. Fantastic. Just moved into a place with a lemon tree and was flummoxed on what to do with our first large harvest. Looking forward to trying this with the next batch of lemons.

  7. My wife and I cook for summer camps and we are catering a wedding in two weeks. Since my last name is Lemmon we always like lemon in our cooking. Your recipe might go well with my barbecued chicken. I think I’ll try it out. Thanks!!

  8. This sounds wonderful. I love lemon in everything. My husband has kidney issues and I give him freshly squeezed lemon juice every day with an organic lemonade. Lamb is our favorite meat as I’m Canadian and he’s Egyptian so this I will definitely give a try.

  9. […] Roasted Lemon Puree (via Mod Meals on Mendenhall) 01 Aug How to Roast a Lamb is full of elaborate sauces and spreads that can seem daunting to the average foodie. Michael Psilakis's recipes sometimes include flipping back and forth across the book up to three or four times to other recipes – adding a teaspoon of another time-consuming confit or dressing. To me, it is the fun of the book. Navigating around it takes some time but once you conquer a dish – it is well worth the time and energy. The same fe … Read More […]

  10. I just made this and LOVE it! A couple of things however – a) the lemon puree seemed to start separating from the olive oil and did not look as smooth as what you have in the picture. It tastes great though. b) there is a very slight bitter taste to the dip, im not sure why that happened. I removed all the pith after I roasted it. Any insight on this would be helpful. I’m definitely making this again 🙂

      • Mine separated a bit too. Used the oil feeder thing with the food processor and that helped. I think it will naturally separate with time though. In terms of the bitterness, did you take out the pith before adding the lemon rind?

  11. […] Roasting a Lamb….. Yes… How to Roast a Lamb is full of elaborate sauces and spreads that can seem daunting to the average foodie. Michael Psilakis's recipes sometimes include flipping back and forth across the book up to three or four times to other recipes – adding a teaspoon of another time-consuming confit or dressing. To me, it is the fun of the book. Navigating around it takes some time but once you conquer a dish – it is well worth the time and energy. The same fe … Read More […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s